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    0 0

    Source: Consortium of International Agricultural Research Centers, Food and Agriculture Organization, International Food Policy Research Institute, International Fund for Agricultural Development, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, UN Conference on Trade and Development, UN SG High-Level Task Force on the Global Food Security Crisis, World Bank, World Food Programme
    Country: World

    Improving Agricultural Growth Critical to Global Food Security

    A New International Organization Report to the G20 Highlights Need for Improving Agricultural Productivity

    Jun 12, 2012

    With a growing global population and rising incomes, global collaboration is urgently needed to ensure sustainable agricultural growth and food security. The issue of food security and development was first taken up at the 2010 G20 Summit in Seoul, with the 2011 G20 Action Plan providing further commitment to the goals of sustainable agricultural development. (For further information on the action items resulting from the 2011 G20 Summit, visit the Food Security Portal.)

    Early in 2012 the Mexican G20 Presidency invited international organizations to examine practical actions that could be undertaken to sustainably improve agricultural productivity growth, in particular on small family farms. The preparation of this report, coordinated by the FAO and the OECD, is a collaborative undertaking by Bioversity, CGIAR Consortium, FAO, IFAD, IFPRI, IICA, OECD, UNCTAD, UN High Level Task Force on the Food Security Crisis, WFP, World Bank, and WTO.

    The report, Sustainable Agricultural Productivity Growth and Bridging the Gap for Small Family Farms, reviews progress made on the commitments of the 2011 G20 Summit, including the creation of the Agricultural Market Information System. Looking forward to the 2012 summit, the report’s authors emphasize the role of investment and innovation in future research and technologies to aid the adoption of more productive and sustainable agricultural solutions. The report states that “substantially reducing trade and production distorting domestic support, improving market access opportunities, eliminating export subsidies and strengthening the disciplines on export restrictions will improve the enabling environment for investment and productivity growth.”

    The report notes the critical role played by IFPRI research, drawing on the Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index, the Statistics of Public Expenditure for Economic Development (SPEED) Database, and the work of ASTI, as well as IFPRI’s work on climate change, food prices and price volatility, agricultural development and the global fertilizer market structure.


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    Source: International Food Policy Research Institute, World Food Programme, Government of Egypt
    Country: Egypt

    May 21, 2013, CAIRO – Poverty and food insecurity in Egypt have risen significantly over the last three years according to joint reports released today by the UN World Food Programme (WFP), the government’s Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS) and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    A report by WFP and CAPMAS found that an estimated 13.7 million Egyptians (or 17 percent of the population) suffered from food insecurity in 2011, compared to 14 percent in 2009. Food security exists when all people, at all times have access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their basic dietary needs. Data shows that between 2009 and 2011, some 15 percent of the population moved into poverty, twice the number who moved out of poverty. Data also suggests that rates of malnutrition, most notably stunting among children aged 6-59 months, are also on the rise.

    “This increase in food insecurity, malnutrition and poverty rates has not happened overnight, during this year or even during the past year,” said WFP Egypt Representative and Country Director GianPietro Bordignon. “People’s inability to have adequate and nutritious food is largely attributed to rising poverty rates and a succession of crises from 2005 -- including the avian influenza epidemic in 2006, the food, fuel and financial crises of 2007–09 and a challenging macroeconomic context in recent years.”

    Pockets of poverty and food insecurity have emerged in urban areas, where poverty increased by nearly 40 percent (from 11 to 15.3 percent) between 2009 and 2011. While rural Upper Egypt continues to have the highest poverty rate, at 51.5 percent of the population (double the national average), Greater Cairo has a larger number of poor and food-insecure people (approximately 3.5 million).

    The average household spends 40.6 percent of its expenditure on food, rising to more than half for the poorest, who are therefore even more vulnerable to food price fluctuations. They buy less expensive, often less nutritious, foods. The findings of The Status of Poverty and Food Security in Egypt: Analysis and Policy Recommendations are based on analysis of the CAPMAS 2011 Household Income and Expenditure and Consumption Survey (HIECS).

    The figures also show that stunting in children under five years of age reached 31 percent in 2011 – above the World Health Organization (WHO) “high” range of 30-39 – up from 23 percent in 2005. Stunting, reflecting chronic malnutrition is irreversible and stops children reaching their full physical and mental potential. And in nine governorates across all regions in 2011, just over half of children under five were estimated to suffer from anaemia, classified as a “severe public health problem” by the WHO.

    WFP and IFPRI also launched a joint policy paper, Tackling Egypt’s Rising Food Insecurity in Times of Transition which examines food subsidies. Losses across the baladi bread (subsidized traditional Egyptian bread) supply chain, for example, are estimated at 30 percent. The ration card system also suffers from poor and limited targeting; it covers close to 68 percent of the population, but excludes 19 percent of the most vulnerable households.

    The paper concludes that while food subsidies have played an important role in protecting the poor from the impact of high food prices, they are not designed to resolve all poverty-related challenges. More targeted food security and nutrition interventions, as well as job-creation initiatives in poorer areas, are required. Reforms to the subsidy system to make it more efficient would allow for savings that could be invested in such interventions.

    “Egypt will experience a triple win: fiscal savings, reaching the most vulnerable, and improved nutrition if the current subsidy system is restructured”, said IFPRI Research Fellow Clemens Breisinger. “The current system is not targeted to those who need it the most.”

    The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) seeks sustainable solutions for ending hunger and poverty. IFPRI was established in 1975 to identify and analyze alternative national and international strategies and policies for meeting the food needs of the developing world, with particular emphasis on low-income countries and on the poorer groups in those countries. It is a member of the CGIAR Consortium. www.ifpri.org.

    WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide. Each year WFP feeds more than 90 million people in more than 70 countries. www.wfp.org

    The Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS) is the official statistical agency of Egypt that collects, processes, analyzes, and disseminates all statistical data and the Census. It is the official provider of data, statistics, and reports. www.capmas.gov.eg

    Contact Information:

    Sarah Immenschuh (IFPRI)

    s.immenschuh@cgiar.org Tel: +1 202-862-5679


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    Source: International Food Policy Research Institute, World Food Programme
    Country: Nigeria

    The Nigerian Comprehensive Food Security and Vulnerability Analysis (CFSVA) provides an in-depth assessment of the food security situation within Nigeria. This is very important as it equips policymakers with timely and relevant information that will aid the targeting of interventions. Some of the most pertinent findings of the study are listed below:

    • Food insecurity and poverty are intricately linked. Some 29 percent of households in the poorest wealth quintiles have unacceptable diets (9 percent poor and 20 percent borderline) compared with 15 percent in the wealthiest (2 percent poor and 13 percent borderline).

    • The poorest livelihoods are found in agriculture. Seventy-seven percent of subsistence farmers are found in the two poorest wealth quintiles, as are 70 percent of mixed or cash crop farmers.

    • The general state of water and sanitation facilities available to households in all wealth categories is very poor, with consequent health implications. Forty-five percent of respondents do not have access to decent toilets, and 85 percent have no proper means of refuse disposal.

    • The vulnerable and food insecure are mostly found in rural areas and the North West and North East regions of Nigeria.

    • Most households in all regions and at all wealth levels purchase food, but rural households and poorer households (by wealth and livelihood) also rely heavily on own food production. Households in the poorest quintiles in both rural and urban areas rely on own production (32 percent rural and 24 percent urban). Wealthier urban households rely mostly on purchases, whereas own production is common at varying levels across all wealth levels for rural households.

    • Nigerians generally consume a starchy diet, but wealthier households can afford more nutrient-rich foods (including animal-based proteins) than poorer households. For instance, the wealthiest households consume meat, fish, and eggs an average of four days a week compared with only two days for the poorest households.

    • Most households protect vulnerable household members in terms of food allocations (women and children), but that may not hold in the poorest households where some difficult allocation decisions may have to be made.

    • Poorer households are more likely to engage in extreme coping strategies (like going a whole day without food) to deal with food shortages.


    0 0

    Source: International Food Policy Research Institute, World Food Programme
    Country: Bangladesh

    DHAKA – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) today presented the first findings of a joint research initiative that explores which types of social safety net transfers work best for the rural ultra-poor. The research initiative is supported and guided by the Government of Bangladesh, and funded by Germany, the United Nations Development Programme, the United States and Switzerland.

    The two year study, which will conclude mid 2014, seeks to determine the benefits of five different types and combinations of transfers – including cash, food, and nutrition education – with regard to three critical outcomes: household income, food security, and child nutrition.

    “In Bangladesh, the majority of safety net interventions are food-based, but cash transfers are becoming increasingly important,” said Christa Räder, WFP Representative in Bangladesh. “This research initiative helps us understand which kinds of social safety net interventions are most effective in improving the food security and child nutrition in ultra-poor families. The findings will create valuable evidence for the Government and inform its social protection strategy.”

    Mid-term findings suggest that nutrition education is critical in leveraging the benefits delivered from food and cash transfers. All participants emphasized that the monthly transfers helped them to feed their families and improve family welfare, but households who participate in nutrition education sessions consumed more -- and more diverse -- foods than those who only received food, cash or both. Participating households in the north-west of the country even showed a significant reduction of chronic child undernutrition (stunting), with those households performing best which have received the intensive nutrition education.

    “This research initiative is the first of its kind, not only in Bangladesh, but globally,” said Dr. Akther Ahmed, lead researcher of the IFPRI team and Chief of Party of the IFPRI Policy Research and Strategy Support Program in Bangladesh. “Our preliminary results suggest that participation in the nutrition education sessions generates benefits beyond nutrition, presumably because these ultra-poor women got empowered in the training process,” he added.

    The transfer modality research is being conducted in ten upazilas across Kurigram, Rangpur, Bagerhat, Bhola, Khulna, Patuakhali, and Pirojpur, reaching 4,000 ultra-poor rural households. Like in many social safety net programmes in Bangladesh women are the participants in this research as they ensure that their families benefit well. The research compares five different types of transfer, each equivalent to BDT1,500 per month:

    • Food only (30 kg rice, 2kg mosur dal, 2 kg vegetable oil per month)
    • Cash only (BDT1,500 per month)
    • Food and Cash combined (15 kg rice, 1kg mosur dal, 1 kg vegetable oil and BDT750 per month)
    • Food and Nutrition Education (weekly sessions)
    • Cash and Nutrition Education (weekly sessions)

    Cash transfers are made through mobile phone technology. Each woman was given a basic mobile handset, a SIM card, and those who receive cash transfers established a mobile bank account.

    The nutrition education involves one-on-one counselling by a trained community nutrition volunteer as well as weekly group sessions which include other family members and influential community members. Using a range of tools and techniques including real-life examples, role plays and cooking demonstrations, they aim to improve knowledge, skills and behaviours in the areas of health, hygiene, sanitation and nutrition.

    Social Safety nets are intended specifically for the poor, or those living near the poverty line, who are vulnerable to economic, social and physical shocks that can undermine their livelihood. In Bangladesh, a wide range of institutions provide assistance to the poor through social safety net programmes.

    The Government of Bangladesh is in the process of finalising a comprehensive social protection strategy. In the fiscal year 2013-14, the government allocated over 25,371 crore taka (US$3.2 billion), more than a tenth of overall budget and representing 2.13 percent of the gross domestic product (GDP), to cover over 90 safety net programmes. Within this allocation, around 38 million people – or 8.5 million households – are covered by food security based social protection programmes and major employment generation and development programmes. For more information please contact:

    IFPRI

    Akhter Ahmed, Chief of Party, IFPRI-PRSSP/Bangladesh, Tel: +880-2- 989-8686; 989-3434, a.ahmed@cgiar.org Md. Shafiqul Karim, Communications Specialist, IFPRI-PRSSP/Bangladesh, Tel: 8801732-822411, m.s.karim@cgiar.org Web:www.ifpri.org

    WFP

    Christa Räder, Representative, WFP/Bangladesh, Tel. +880-2-9183022-33, christa.rader@wfp.org Cornelia Pätz, Public Information Officer, WFP/Bangladesh, Tel. +8801755642167, cornelia.paetz@wfp.org Web: www.wfp.org/countries/Bangladesh | Facebook: www.facebook.com/WFP.Bangladesh


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    Source: Government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, International Food Policy Research Institute, World Food Programme
    Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

    Janvier 2014

    Données collectées en 2011-2012

    SOMMAIRE

    Les organismes des Nations Unies en RDC ont formulé le Plan Cadre des Nations Unies pour l’assistance au Développement (UNDAF) pour la période 2013-2017. Le gouvernement de la RDC s'est engagé à collaborer avec les organismes des Nations Unies pour atteindre les objectifs énoncés dans l'UNDAF, en particulier en ce qui concerne les principaux piliers du deuxième document stratégique pour la croissance et la réduction de la pauvreté (DSCRP 2) qui définit une large gamme de priorités couvrant la période 2011-2015. En même temps, le PAM et d'autres organisations humanitaires continuent de répondre aux besoins des ménages touchés par l'insécurité alimentaire, la malnutrition et la faim grâce à leurs programmes respectifs.

    Malgré l'énorme potentiel agricole du pays, la majorité de la population de la RDC reste largement exposée à l'insécurité alimentaire, la malnutrition et la faim. La RDC est l'un des rares pays africains qui ont un potentiel énorme pour le développement d’une agriculture durable (en millions d'hectares de terres cultivables potentielles, une diversité de climats, un important réseau hydrographique, une énorme potentiel halieutique et un potentiel important pour l'élevage. Pourtant, la RDC est classée parmi les Pays à Faible Revenu et à Déficit Vivrier (PFRDV). En termes d'Indice de Développement Humain, le PNUD a classé le pays au 187ème rang sur les 187 pays répertoriés en 2011. La situation de la sécurité alimentaire reste précaire ; l'enquête par grappes à indicateurs multiples (MICS) de 2010 a indiqué que 57,8 % des personnes vivant en RDC ont une consommation alimentaire pauvre ou limitée. Le rapport IPC (Phase Intégrée de Classification de la sécurité alimentaire) de novembre 2012 a estimé à 5,4 millions le nombre de personnes en situation de crise alimentaire aiguë. Selon le rapport de l'IFPRI de 2011, l'indice global de la faim (GHI) de la RDC a augmenté de 63 %, principalement à cause du conflit et de l'instabilité politique. Les résultats des récentes évaluations sur la sécurité alimentaire menées par le PAM dans la Province Orientale, le Nord et le Sud Kivu, le Kasaï Occidental, l’Équateur, le Maniema et le Katanga ont montré que, en moyenne, plus d’un ménage sur trois en RDC ont une consommation alimentaire pauvre ou limitée. Les évaluations récentes menées dans les zones touchées par le conflit armé au Nord-Kivu, Sud-Kivu et Katanga indiquent des taux de malnutrition aiguë globale dépassant le seuil d’urgence de 15 pourcent dans plusieurs zones.

    Dans ce contexte, une analyse approfondie de la sécurité alimentaire et de la vulnérabilité (CFSVA) est destinée à fournir une meilleure compréhension de l'insécurité alimentaire et de la vulnérabilité des ménages ruraux dans tout le pays. Cette compréhension guidera l'élaboration de stratégies appropriées pour répondre aux besoins des personnes touchées par l'insécurité alimentaire. L'analyse actuelle aidera également à orienter les interventions du gouvernement, des agences des Nations Unies, dont le PAM et d'autres organisations humanitaires. Elle permettra aussi de mettre à jour les indicateurs de base sur la sécurité alimentaire utilisée par rapport à la précédente CFSVA conduite par le PAM et le gouvernement en 2008.

    La CFSVA actuelle repose essentiellement sur l'Enquête d’Analyse de la Sécurité Alimentaire et de la Vulnérabilité menée auprès des ménages conçue et effectuée en 2011-2012 par le PAM en partenariat avec le Ministère de l'Agriculture, PRONANUT, l’INS, la FAO, l'UNICEF, les ONG, les membres nationaux et provinciaux du groupe pour la sécurité alimentaire.

    L'enquête a été menée en 2011-2012 et a couvert 24 884 ménages ruraux dans 10 provinces.
    Une approche par échantillonnage stratifié et à plusieurs degrés a été utilisée pour obtenir des estimations d'un ensemble d’indicateurs de sécurité alimentaires aux niveaux territorial, provincial et national.
    Le présent rapport comprend des conclusions précises sur le nombre de personnes en insécurité alimentaire et vulnérables dans le pays, la répartition géographique des groupes souffrant d'insécurité alimentaire et vulnérables, leurs caractéristiques, leur capacité à gérer les chocs et les facteurs qui sont à la base de l'insécurité alimentaire et de la vulnérabilité. Il reprend les résultats supplémentaires de l'Enquête par grappes à indicateurs multiples (MICS 2010) et de l'Enquête Démographique et de Santé (EDS, 2007) afin de donner une image complète de l’insécurité alimentaire et de la malnutrition.

    L'évaluation de l'état de sécurité alimentaire des ménages en RDC commence par l'analyse de la consommation en nourriture des ménages, qui est basée sur le score de consommation alimentaire (SCA) et complétée par l’indice de richesse et les stratégies de survie des ménages.


    0 0

    Source: Government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, International Food Policy Research Institute, World Food Programme
    Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

    This CFSVA report mainly builds on the Food Security and Vulnerability Analysis household survey designed and implemented in 2011-2012 by WFP in partnership with the Ministry of Agriculture, the National Nutrition Program, the National Institute of Statistics, FAO, UNICEF, NGOs, national and international members of the food security cluster. The survey covered 24,884 rural households in 10 provinces. A stratified and multi-stage sampling approach was used to provide estimates of a set of food and nutritional security indicators at the provincial and national levels.

    This report includes specific findings on the number of food insecure and vulnerable people in the country, the geographic distribution of the food insecure and vulnerable groups, their characteristics, their capacity to manage shocks, and the driving forces of food insecurity and vulnerability.


    0 0

    Source: CGIAR, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, International Food Policy Research Institute, International Fund for Agricultural Development, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, UN Conference on Trade and Development, UN SG High-Level Task Force on the Global Food Security Crisis, World Bank, World Food Programme
    Country: World

    Improving Agricultural Growth Critical to Global Food Security

    A New International Organization Report to the G20 Highlights Need for Improving Agricultural Productivity

    Jun 12, 2012

    With a growing global population and rising incomes, global collaboration is urgently needed to ensure sustainable agricultural growth and food security. The issue of food security and development was first taken up at the 2010 G20 Summit in Seoul, with the 2011 G20 Action Plan providing further commitment to the goals of sustainable agricultural development. (For further information on the action items resulting from the 2011 G20 Summit, visit the Food Security Portal.)

    Early in 2012 the Mexican G20 Presidency invited international organizations to examine practical actions that could be undertaken to sustainably improve agricultural productivity growth, in particular on small family farms. The preparation of this report, coordinated by the FAO and the OECD, is a collaborative undertaking by Bioversity, CGIAR Consortium, FAO, IFAD, IFPRI, IICA, OECD, UNCTAD, UN High Level Task Force on the Food Security Crisis, WFP, World Bank, and WTO.

    The report, Sustainable Agricultural Productivity Growth and Bridging the Gap for Small Family Farms, reviews progress made on the commitments of the 2011 G20 Summit, including the creation of the Agricultural Market Information System. Looking forward to the 2012 summit, the report’s authors emphasize the role of investment and innovation in future research and technologies to aid the adoption of more productive and sustainable agricultural solutions. The report states that “substantially reducing trade and production distorting domestic support, improving market access opportunities, eliminating export subsidies and strengthening the disciplines on export restrictions will improve the enabling environment for investment and productivity growth.”

    The report notes the critical role played by IFPRI research, drawing on the Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index, the Statistics of Public Expenditure for Economic Development (SPEED) Database, and the work of ASTI, as well as IFPRI’s work on climate change, food prices and price volatility, agricultural development and the global fertilizer market structure.


    0 0

    Source: International Food Policy Research Institute, World Food Programme, Government of Egypt
    Country: Egypt

    May 21, 2013, CAIRO – Poverty and food insecurity in Egypt have risen significantly over the last three years according to joint reports released today by the UN World Food Programme (WFP), the government’s Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS) and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    A report by WFP and CAPMAS found that an estimated 13.7 million Egyptians (or 17 percent of the population) suffered from food insecurity in 2011, compared to 14 percent in 2009. Food security exists when all people, at all times have access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their basic dietary needs. Data shows that between 2009 and 2011, some 15 percent of the population moved into poverty, twice the number who moved out of poverty. Data also suggests that rates of malnutrition, most notably stunting among children aged 6-59 months, are also on the rise.

    “This increase in food insecurity, malnutrition and poverty rates has not happened overnight, during this year or even during the past year,” said WFP Egypt Representative and Country Director GianPietro Bordignon. “People’s inability to have adequate and nutritious food is largely attributed to rising poverty rates and a succession of crises from 2005 -- including the avian influenza epidemic in 2006, the food, fuel and financial crises of 2007–09 and a challenging macroeconomic context in recent years.”

    Pockets of poverty and food insecurity have emerged in urban areas, where poverty increased by nearly 40 percent (from 11 to 15.3 percent) between 2009 and 2011. While rural Upper Egypt continues to have the highest poverty rate, at 51.5 percent of the population (double the national average), Greater Cairo has a larger number of poor and food-insecure people (approximately 3.5 million).

    The average household spends 40.6 percent of its expenditure on food, rising to more than half for the poorest, who are therefore even more vulnerable to food price fluctuations. They buy less expensive, often less nutritious, foods. The findings of The Status of Poverty and Food Security in Egypt: Analysis and Policy Recommendations are based on analysis of the CAPMAS 2011 Household Income and Expenditure and Consumption Survey (HIECS).

    The figures also show that stunting in children under five years of age reached 31 percent in 2011 – above the World Health Organization (WHO) “high” range of 30-39 – up from 23 percent in 2005. Stunting, reflecting chronic malnutrition is irreversible and stops children reaching their full physical and mental potential. And in nine governorates across all regions in 2011, just over half of children under five were estimated to suffer from anaemia, classified as a “severe public health problem” by the WHO.

    WFP and IFPRI also launched a joint policy paper, Tackling Egypt’s Rising Food Insecurity in Times of Transition which examines food subsidies. Losses across the baladi bread (subsidized traditional Egyptian bread) supply chain, for example, are estimated at 30 percent. The ration card system also suffers from poor and limited targeting; it covers close to 68 percent of the population, but excludes 19 percent of the most vulnerable households.

    The paper concludes that while food subsidies have played an important role in protecting the poor from the impact of high food prices, they are not designed to resolve all poverty-related challenges. More targeted food security and nutrition interventions, as well as job-creation initiatives in poorer areas, are required. Reforms to the subsidy system to make it more efficient would allow for savings that could be invested in such interventions.

    “Egypt will experience a triple win: fiscal savings, reaching the most vulnerable, and improved nutrition if the current subsidy system is restructured”, said IFPRI Research Fellow Clemens Breisinger. “The current system is not targeted to those who need it the most.”

    The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) seeks sustainable solutions for ending hunger and poverty. IFPRI was established in 1975 to identify and analyze alternative national and international strategies and policies for meeting the food needs of the developing world, with particular emphasis on low-income countries and on the poorer groups in those countries. It is a member of the CGIAR Consortium. www.ifpri.org.

    WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide. Each year WFP feeds more than 90 million people in more than 70 countries. www.wfp.org

    The Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS) is the official statistical agency of Egypt that collects, processes, analyzes, and disseminates all statistical data and the Census. It is the official provider of data, statistics, and reports. www.capmas.gov.eg

    Contact Information:

    Sarah Immenschuh (IFPRI)

    s.immenschuh@cgiar.org Tel: +1 202-862-5679


    0 0

    Source: International Food Policy Research Institute, World Food Programme
    Country: Nigeria

    The Nigerian Comprehensive Food Security and Vulnerability Analysis (CFSVA) provides an in-depth assessment of the food security situation within Nigeria. This is very important as it equips policymakers with timely and relevant information that will aid the targeting of interventions. Some of the most pertinent findings of the study are listed below:

    • Food insecurity and poverty are intricately linked. Some 29 percent of households in the poorest wealth quintiles have unacceptable diets (9 percent poor and 20 percent borderline) compared with 15 percent in the wealthiest (2 percent poor and 13 percent borderline).

    • The poorest livelihoods are found in agriculture. Seventy-seven percent of subsistence farmers are found in the two poorest wealth quintiles, as are 70 percent of mixed or cash crop farmers.

    • The general state of water and sanitation facilities available to households in all wealth categories is very poor, with consequent health implications. Forty-five percent of respondents do not have access to decent toilets, and 85 percent have no proper means of refuse disposal.

    • The vulnerable and food insecure are mostly found in rural areas and the North West and North East regions of Nigeria.

    • Most households in all regions and at all wealth levels purchase food, but rural households and poorer households (by wealth and livelihood) also rely heavily on own food production. Households in the poorest quintiles in both rural and urban areas rely on own production (32 percent rural and 24 percent urban). Wealthier urban households rely mostly on purchases, whereas own production is common at varying levels across all wealth levels for rural households.

    • Nigerians generally consume a starchy diet, but wealthier households can afford more nutrient-rich foods (including animal-based proteins) than poorer households. For instance, the wealthiest households consume meat, fish, and eggs an average of four days a week compared with only two days for the poorest households.

    • Most households protect vulnerable household members in terms of food allocations (women and children), but that may not hold in the poorest households where some difficult allocation decisions may have to be made.

    • Poorer households are more likely to engage in extreme coping strategies (like going a whole day without food) to deal with food shortages.


    0 0

    Source: International Food Policy Research Institute, World Food Programme
    Country: Bangladesh

    DHAKA – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) today presented the first findings of a joint research initiative that explores which types of social safety net transfers work best for the rural ultra-poor. The research initiative is supported and guided by the Government of Bangladesh, and funded by Germany, the United Nations Development Programme, the United States and Switzerland.

    The two year study, which will conclude mid 2014, seeks to determine the benefits of five different types and combinations of transfers – including cash, food, and nutrition education – with regard to three critical outcomes: household income, food security, and child nutrition.

    “In Bangladesh, the majority of safety net interventions are food-based, but cash transfers are becoming increasingly important,” said Christa Räder, WFP Representative in Bangladesh. “This research initiative helps us understand which kinds of social safety net interventions are most effective in improving the food security and child nutrition in ultra-poor families. The findings will create valuable evidence for the Government and inform its social protection strategy.”

    Mid-term findings suggest that nutrition education is critical in leveraging the benefits delivered from food and cash transfers. All participants emphasized that the monthly transfers helped them to feed their families and improve family welfare, but households who participate in nutrition education sessions consumed more -- and more diverse -- foods than those who only received food, cash or both. Participating households in the north-west of the country even showed a significant reduction of chronic child undernutrition (stunting), with those households performing best which have received the intensive nutrition education.

    “This research initiative is the first of its kind, not only in Bangladesh, but globally,” said Dr. Akther Ahmed, lead researcher of the IFPRI team and Chief of Party of the IFPRI Policy Research and Strategy Support Program in Bangladesh. “Our preliminary results suggest that participation in the nutrition education sessions generates benefits beyond nutrition, presumably because these ultra-poor women got empowered in the training process,” he added.

    The transfer modality research is being conducted in ten upazilas across Kurigram, Rangpur, Bagerhat, Bhola, Khulna, Patuakhali, and Pirojpur, reaching 4,000 ultra-poor rural households. Like in many social safety net programmes in Bangladesh women are the participants in this research as they ensure that their families benefit well. The research compares five different types of transfer, each equivalent to BDT1,500 per month:

    • Food only (30 kg rice, 2kg mosur dal, 2 kg vegetable oil per month)
    • Cash only (BDT1,500 per month)
    • Food and Cash combined (15 kg rice, 1kg mosur dal, 1 kg vegetable oil and BDT750 per month)
    • Food and Nutrition Education (weekly sessions)
    • Cash and Nutrition Education (weekly sessions)

    Cash transfers are made through mobile phone technology. Each woman was given a basic mobile handset, a SIM card, and those who receive cash transfers established a mobile bank account.

    The nutrition education involves one-on-one counselling by a trained community nutrition volunteer as well as weekly group sessions which include other family members and influential community members. Using a range of tools and techniques including real-life examples, role plays and cooking demonstrations, they aim to improve knowledge, skills and behaviours in the areas of health, hygiene, sanitation and nutrition.

    Social Safety nets are intended specifically for the poor, or those living near the poverty line, who are vulnerable to economic, social and physical shocks that can undermine their livelihood. In Bangladesh, a wide range of institutions provide assistance to the poor through social safety net programmes.

    The Government of Bangladesh is in the process of finalising a comprehensive social protection strategy. In the fiscal year 2013-14, the government allocated over 25,371 crore taka (US$3.2 billion), more than a tenth of overall budget and representing 2.13 percent of the gross domestic product (GDP), to cover over 90 safety net programmes. Within this allocation, around 38 million people – or 8.5 million households – are covered by food security based social protection programmes and major employment generation and development programmes. For more information please contact:

    IFPRI

    Akhter Ahmed, Chief of Party, IFPRI-PRSSP/Bangladesh, Tel: +880-2- 989-8686; 989-3434, a.ahmed@cgiar.org Md. Shafiqul Karim, Communications Specialist, IFPRI-PRSSP/Bangladesh, Tel: 8801732-822411, m.s.karim@cgiar.org Web:www.ifpri.org

    WFP

    Christa Räder, Representative, WFP/Bangladesh, Tel. +880-2-9183022-33, christa.rader@wfp.org Cornelia Pätz, Public Information Officer, WFP/Bangladesh, Tel. +8801755642167, cornelia.paetz@wfp.org Web: www.wfp.org/countries/Bangladesh | Facebook: www.facebook.com/WFP.Bangladesh


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    Source: Government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, International Food Policy Research Institute, World Food Programme
    Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

    Janvier 2014

    Données collectées en 2011-2012

    SOMMAIRE

    Les organismes des Nations Unies en RDC ont formulé le Plan Cadre des Nations Unies pour l’assistance au Développement (UNDAF) pour la période 2013-2017. Le gouvernement de la RDC s'est engagé à collaborer avec les organismes des Nations Unies pour atteindre les objectifs énoncés dans l'UNDAF, en particulier en ce qui concerne les principaux piliers du deuxième document stratégique pour la croissance et la réduction de la pauvreté (DSCRP 2) qui définit une large gamme de priorités couvrant la période 2011-2015. En même temps, le PAM et d'autres organisations humanitaires continuent de répondre aux besoins des ménages touchés par l'insécurité alimentaire, la malnutrition et la faim grâce à leurs programmes respectifs.

    Malgré l'énorme potentiel agricole du pays, la majorité de la population de la RDC reste largement exposée à l'insécurité alimentaire, la malnutrition et la faim. La RDC est l'un des rares pays africains qui ont un potentiel énorme pour le développement d’une agriculture durable (en millions d'hectares de terres cultivables potentielles, une diversité de climats, un important réseau hydrographique, une énorme potentiel halieutique et un potentiel important pour l'élevage. Pourtant, la RDC est classée parmi les Pays à Faible Revenu et à Déficit Vivrier (PFRDV). En termes d'Indice de Développement Humain, le PNUD a classé le pays au 187ème rang sur les 187 pays répertoriés en 2011. La situation de la sécurité alimentaire reste précaire ; l'enquête par grappes à indicateurs multiples (MICS) de 2010 a indiqué que 57,8 % des personnes vivant en RDC ont une consommation alimentaire pauvre ou limitée. Le rapport IPC (Phase Intégrée de Classification de la sécurité alimentaire) de novembre 2012 a estimé à 5,4 millions le nombre de personnes en situation de crise alimentaire aiguë. Selon le rapport de l'IFPRI de 2011, l'indice global de la faim (GHI) de la RDC a augmenté de 63 %, principalement à cause du conflit et de l'instabilité politique. Les résultats des récentes évaluations sur la sécurité alimentaire menées par le PAM dans la Province Orientale, le Nord et le Sud Kivu, le Kasaï Occidental, l’Équateur, le Maniema et le Katanga ont montré que, en moyenne, plus d’un ménage sur trois en RDC ont une consommation alimentaire pauvre ou limitée. Les évaluations récentes menées dans les zones touchées par le conflit armé au Nord-Kivu, Sud-Kivu et Katanga indiquent des taux de malnutrition aiguë globale dépassant le seuil d’urgence de 15 pourcent dans plusieurs zones.

    Dans ce contexte, une analyse approfondie de la sécurité alimentaire et de la vulnérabilité (CFSVA) est destinée à fournir une meilleure compréhension de l'insécurité alimentaire et de la vulnérabilité des ménages ruraux dans tout le pays. Cette compréhension guidera l'élaboration de stratégies appropriées pour répondre aux besoins des personnes touchées par l'insécurité alimentaire. L'analyse actuelle aidera également à orienter les interventions du gouvernement, des agences des Nations Unies, dont le PAM et d'autres organisations humanitaires. Elle permettra aussi de mettre à jour les indicateurs de base sur la sécurité alimentaire utilisée par rapport à la précédente CFSVA conduite par le PAM et le gouvernement en 2008.

    La CFSVA actuelle repose essentiellement sur l'Enquête d’Analyse de la Sécurité Alimentaire et de la Vulnérabilité menée auprès des ménages conçue et effectuée en 2011-2012 par le PAM en partenariat avec le Ministère de l'Agriculture, PRONANUT, l’INS, la FAO, l'UNICEF, les ONG, les membres nationaux et provinciaux du groupe pour la sécurité alimentaire.

    L'enquête a été menée en 2011-2012 et a couvert 24 884 ménages ruraux dans 10 provinces.
    Une approche par échantillonnage stratifié et à plusieurs degrés a été utilisée pour obtenir des estimations d'un ensemble d’indicateurs de sécurité alimentaires aux niveaux territorial, provincial et national.
    Le présent rapport comprend des conclusions précises sur le nombre de personnes en insécurité alimentaire et vulnérables dans le pays, la répartition géographique des groupes souffrant d'insécurité alimentaire et vulnérables, leurs caractéristiques, leur capacité à gérer les chocs et les facteurs qui sont à la base de l'insécurité alimentaire et de la vulnérabilité. Il reprend les résultats supplémentaires de l'Enquête par grappes à indicateurs multiples (MICS 2010) et de l'Enquête Démographique et de Santé (EDS, 2007) afin de donner une image complète de l’insécurité alimentaire et de la malnutrition.

    L'évaluation de l'état de sécurité alimentaire des ménages en RDC commence par l'analyse de la consommation en nourriture des ménages, qui est basée sur le score de consommation alimentaire (SCA) et complétée par l’indice de richesse et les stratégies de survie des ménages.


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    Source: Government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, International Food Policy Research Institute, World Food Programme
    Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

    This CFSVA report mainly builds on the Food Security and Vulnerability Analysis household survey designed and implemented in 2011-2012 by WFP in partnership with the Ministry of Agriculture, the National Nutrition Program, the National Institute of Statistics, FAO, UNICEF, NGOs, national and international members of the food security cluster. The survey covered 24,884 rural households in 10 provinces. A stratified and multi-stage sampling approach was used to provide estimates of a set of food and nutritional security indicators at the provincial and national levels.

    This report includes specific findings on the number of food insecure and vulnerable people in the country, the geographic distribution of the food insecure and vulnerable groups, their characteristics, their capacity to manage shocks, and the driving forces of food insecurity and vulnerability.